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WATER, WATER, WATER

“Residents [Lacey, WA.] might not be able to water their lawns anytime they want this summer. City leaders could impose restrictions as the city faces another summer without the ability to pump more water from the ground. Under a proposal, utility customers would be asked or required to water on specific days, depending on whether they live at an odd- or even-numbered address. For example, watering at odd-numbered addresses could be restricted to Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. The City Council will consider the proposal during a work session tonight [May 18]. It will decide whether odd-even watering would be voluntary or required. The citys staff have recommended that it be required. If approved, odd-even watering would run from June 1 to Sept. 30,” quoting The Olympian.
[Ed. Note: Will Yelm be far behind its neighbor 16 miles to the northwest with 1,800 new homes to be built in the next 5 years?]
And this from May 19th from Seattle’s ABC affiliate KOMO-TV4:
“The city of Lacey plans to regulate when residents can water their lawns this summer. The city council will consider an “odd-even” watering day system at its May 25 meeting.City officials say alternating days will help keep the demand for water from exceeding the supply. The city has nearly halted its growth because of a limited water supply.”
From the March 20, 2006 Olympian:
“Demand for water in South Sound could exceed the usable supply in as little as five years, according to one consultants report. Such predictions have led some water experts to call for Olympia, Lacey, Tumwater and Thurston County to pool water resources and manage them cooperatively.
‘Theres not going to be enough water if its managed unilaterally by the individual cities,’ predicted Bob Wubbena, vice president of HDR Engineering Inc. and a consultant to the Thurston Public Utility District. Theres not going to be enough water if its managed unilaterally by the individual cities, predicted Bob Wubbena, vice president of HDR Engineering Inc. and a consultant to the Thurston Public Utility District. ‘We need a coordinated alliance of jurisdictions to manage water.’ But at least three things stand in the way of any regional water alliance: the cities of Olympia, Lacey and Tumwater. The three cities operate separate water systems, have separate rates and policies and submit applications individually for additional water rights to supply a growing population. Under state law, water is owned by the public.”

Yelm should take heed as this issue is looming on the horizon here, as well.

Posted by Steve on May 22, 2006 at 4:20 pm | Permalink

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